The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Nut pines for pine nuts

Korean Nut Pine coneI've always been curious about pine nuts, but never took the time to research them properly.  Stone Pine (Pinus pinea) is the European response to producing pine nuts, but is really only good to zone 7.  Instead, Jacke suggested Korean nut pine (Pinus koraiensis) for our region since it is tolerant of cold weather and makes high quality nuts.

Planting a nut pine is an experiment with a capital E.  The trees are huge, so we'll be cutting a gap in the pine forest on the south end of our garden to plant them in rather than using up precious garden space.  Some folks say Korean nut pines bear in 3 to 8 years.  Others warn you that you'll need to wait 40 years.  Hmmm.... :-)

The seedlings are pricey, so I decided to try my hand at germinating seeds bought on ebay.  (Don't try to just plant the pine nuts you'd buy in the grocery store --- without their protective shell, these rot in the ground.)  Stay tuned for updates on this experiment...over the next 40 years.


This post is part of our Splurging on Perennials lunchtime series.  Read all of the entries:





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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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