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Seed giveaway

Favorite varietiesWriting about seed saving in the September volume of Weekend Homesteader tempted me to save a lot more seeds than I usually do.  I ended up with too many for next year's garden, so I thought I'd share some of my favorite varieties with one lucky reader.  All of the seeds included are easy to save, so if you enjoy them, you can keep the variety going in your garden indefinitely.  Here are the vegetables I'll include in my starter pack:

  • Masai Beans --- Prolific, stringless, delicious, French-style bush beans.  We won't plant any other kind of green bean.
  • Martino's Roma Tomato --- Although we plant a few other types of tomatoes for fresh eating, this is our big producer.  It's a semi-determinate plant, so you get masses of tomatoes all at once, which is perfect for preserving.  The fruit dry well and cook into sauces perfectly.  Martino's Roma is somewhat resistant to various blights.
  • Tangerine Pimiento Sweet Pepper --- This pepper is perfect for the lazy gardener who doesn't want to start peppers inside before the frost.  Direct-seeded, my plants still put out plenty of ripe peppers before the frost since the fruits are small and bulk up fast.
  • Mexican Sour Gherkin --- If you live in a warm, humid climate, it's tough to grow cucumbers organically, but Mexican Sour Gherkins resist all of the usual diseases.  They're slower to fruit than cucumbers and the fruits are tiny, so it's a bit like picking berries to harvest them, but Mark thinks they have a superior taste to cucumbers.  Mexican Sour Gherkins would be an especially good choice for the stealth urban homesteader since the vines are beautiful and don't look much like vegetables.
  • Sugar Baby Watermelon --- The small size of these watermelons means that Mark and I can often eat a fruit in one sitting.  Having lots of small watermelons in your garden rather than one or two big ones means you lose less if you pick them at the wrong time (which is the toughest part of growing watermelons.)  And unlike other melons (which succumb to molds and mildews), my Sugar Baby Watermelons shrug off our humid summers.


To be entered in the giveway, just promote one of my ebooks in any way you choose.  I'm most in need of a review for the October volume of Weekend Homesteader, but you can post a link on Facebook or your blog, email your friends, tell your Mom, or do whatever suits your fancy.  No need to buy the ebooks to enter --- just email me and I'll gladly send you a free pdf copy of whichever ebook(s) you choose.

Leave a comment on this post by midnight on Sunday, October 2, to let me know you've entered, and I'll pick one of you at random on Monday morning to win the seed package.  Thanks in advance for helping spread the word about my newest ebook!



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Shared on FB, will try to get a review up on Amazon early next week. Thanks so much for the great information. My next-spring herb garden is now covered with cardboard/compost/mulch, creating a good foundation for lots o'dill, basil, lavender, rosemary, chives and whatever else I decide to throw in it!
Comment by Debbi Fri Sep 30 09:07:29 2011

Hey, thanks for this cool opportunity. I am a student right now in my last year of college. I love catching up on your blog between classes every day, it really helps to calm me down and look to the future of what I want to do and the way I want to live my life after graduation. If I can be entered I'm going to make a post on my facebook. Thanks.

Comment by Justus Rowe Fri Sep 30 09:08:12 2011
I actually posted on a homesteading-specific group on Facebook, so hopefully that will get you some relevant exposure. Haven't read it yet, but as soon as I do I'll try and put up an Amazon review. Keep up the good work!
Comment by Jessie : Improved Fri Sep 30 11:52:45 2011

I love your Weekend Homesteader series. got them all from Amazon for my Kindle! Just got the October version this morning. Love your website. It is informative-inspiring and Fun! Keep up the great work. Thanks!!! I sincerely mean every word. And your Seed giveaways are wonderful way to share usual seeds.

Comment by Jackie Sexton Fri Sep 30 12:45:01 2011
Thank you to everyone for helping make our ebook series a success! Debbi, I'm thrilled to hear you're working on a kill mulch for next year's garden --- now's a perfect time to make sure those weeds really rot.
Comment by anna Fri Sep 30 13:18:40 2011
Can't wait to read the October issue...will get reviews posted ASAP!
Comment by April Chase Fri Sep 30 13:35:12 2011
Thanks for the contest, website, and the homesteader ebooks. I left a comment on Amazon.
Comment by Brian Ring Sat Oct 1 01:05:24 2011
You all are my heroes --- due to someone's hard work, the September volume hit #833 out of nearly a million kindle ebooks this morning!! I'm floored! Thank you!
Comment by anna Sat Oct 1 10:37:07 2011

I've been trying to spread the word and support your efforts, I've posted about you on Google Plus and I bought one of your e-books a few weeks ago and found it full of great info.

Your seed give away is a great offer, but I don't think your southern seeds would appreciate my northern climate one bit. So please don't include me in the drawing.

I will continue to spread the word because I think you have a great site, great products and tons of good information.

Keep up the good work, your posts go perfect with my morning coffee!

Comment by Justin Sun Oct 2 10:00:27 2011
Wow! Thank you! Hopefully I'll have something more northern compatible for our next giveaway.
Comment by anna Sun Oct 2 13:31:36 2011

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime