The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Tangerine Pimiento Sweet Pepper

Tangerine Pimiento Sweet PepperWe like our peppers red or yellow and sweet, but I'm not usually willing to put in the time to start them indoors in early spring.  They seem to be more tender than tomatoes, and unable to be started in a cold frame.  That means I direct sow peppers right around our spring frost free date, and hope some will have time to ripen all the way before the first fall frost.  Last year, we didn't have much luck --- I gave away grocery bags full of big, beautiful green peppers right before the frost, but only got to eat a few ripe ones.

This year, we tried another variety which may prove to be our new favorite.  Tangerine Pimiento Sweet Pepper is extremely early producing --- we've been eating the sweet, orange fruits since early September despite direct-seeding them at the end of April.  The peppers are small, which is probably how they're able to ripen so early, and are held upright so the bottoms point at the sky.  I can't find any data on whether Tangerine Pimiento Sweet Pepper is an heirloom, but I'm saving some seeds anyway and hoping to have an equally good pepper season next year.



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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