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Two-month-old goat kids

Goat family

Guess who's two months old today? That's right, our twins are growing up!

(Warning: R-rated information follows.)

Headbutting buckling

Unfortunately, two months old for a buckling means Punkin has become a cantankerous and randy teenager. The endless headbutting is annoying but manageable. However, his other MO --- endlessly humping his sister --- is more problematic. He's already reached the stage where he gets an erection (and licks the stream of his urine --- delightful), meaning that he could possibly knock his sister up.

Grazing goats

Unfortunately, my goat mentor says two months old is a little dicey for weaning. Our kids have started really eating solid food in the past week, but their rumens probably still depend on receiving a mixture of milk and greenery. So this week we hope to figure out a way to separate Punkin while still letting him have daily nursing visits with his mama. Yes, I'm well aware that much screaming is going to ensue --- I just hope I'm not the one who ends up throwing the biggest tantrum.



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We used to love our Saanens. They actually taught our kids how to balance when they were little, so that horse back riding was a cinch. ;) But, now on our 3 acres in a village, we are sneaking chickens, but I don't think that we could get away with goats. Especially since we all know what great escape artists they are, and our farmer neighbors might not appreciate rogue goats in their corn crops. :) Loved your story. Brought me back.
Comment by Jean Henry Wed Jun 22 06:53:44 2016

Those two sure are cuties! It's unlikely he could get your doeling pregnant because she won't even start coming into heat until mid fall at the earliest. But I know how annoying it can be, our 5 week old buckling thinks humping is the funnest game ever!

Comment by Another Julie Wed Jun 22 18:19:52 2016
Some goats only go into heat in the fall but Nigerian Dwarfs definitely go into heat all year. I have raised Nigerian Dwarfs for a long time and they are very consistent. It's one of the reasons I love that breed. It's easy to get milk year round. Also, separating a goat is one of the meanest things you can do to them. They are very social and need to be with at least one other one. In my opinion you should keep more goats. They are much happier in groups. More goats doesn't have to mean more work. We let our goats forage for all their food and we only feed the moms when we milk them. They are healthy, fat and happy.
Comment by Anonymous Thu Jun 23 10:35:15 2016

Thanks everyone for your thoughtful comments! To answer a few questions: Punkin is supposed to become a neighbor's new stud, so we can't band him. We'd planned to give him to said neighbor in lieu of weaning him here, but the neighbor has health problems and can't take him yet. I suspect Julie might be right and Aurora wouldn't get pregnant so early...but it's hard to be 100% sure. This comment (plus scare stories elsewhere on the internet) certainly seem to suggest I'd rather be safe then sorry.

That said, after less than a day of tethering, I realized that one of our pastures is Fort Knox enough to keep Punkin in. So I put him there and his mother and sister in the adjoining pasture so they can talk through the cattle panel. They're still not thrilled, but are much happier than when truly separated.

Comment by anna Thu Jun 23 12:35:17 2016

Thanks everyone for your thoughtful comments! To answer a few questions: Punkin is supposed to become a neighbor's new stud, so we can't band him. We'd planned to give him to said neighbor in lieu of weaning him here, but the neighbor has health problems and can't take him yet. I suspect Julie might be right and Aurora wouldn't get pregnant so early...but it's hard to be 100% sure. This comment (plus scare stories elsewhere on the internet) certainly seem to suggest I'd rather be safe then sorry.

That said, after less than a day of tethering, I realized that one of our pastures is Fort Knox enough to keep Punkin in. So I put him there and his mother and sister in the adjoining pasture so they can talk through the cattle panel. They're still not thrilled, but are much happier than when truly separated.

Comment by anna Thu Jun 23 12:35:55 2016
We have two female boer goats that have just had twins each. We have now separated the male adult boer goat to give the females a rest from his constant humping. When would be a good time to let him back with the herd. I would assume at weaning of our new kids but I am not sure?
Comment by beau Wed Aug 3 20:36:49 2016