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The space-time continuum

Figgy homestead

Bowl of blueberriesMom is a New-England expatriate, so the summer that seemed so strange to me was reminiscent of her childhood.  She predicts we'll see our first frost very early this year --- September 21. 

What do you think?  To make guessing easier, our average first-frost date is October 10.  I'm hoping we'll stave off frost for as long as possible since we've yet to taste our first fig of the year and the tree is loaded.


Pond

We've had so much rain recently that our experimental pond has overflowed its banks, spreading duckweed throughout the back garden.  Isn't it astonishing how quickly duckweed reproduces?

Kayla in the garden

Trellised butternutIn the vegetable garden, Kayla has been doing over half my work for the last month or two.  I feel a bit guilty when she's out there weeding instead of me, but I always find plenty of other work to do.  Apparently, gardening time is like a pot of soup --- you'll fill it all the way to the top no matter how much space/time is alloted.  Or maybe it's just the astonishing amount of fruit needing processing this summer that has used up all that spare time.

I know this post is disjointed, but all three elements somehow join together in my head, meshing in some odd way along with my fuzzy recollection of the space-time continuum.  Or maybe I just really wanted to post a bunch of pictures and needed words to go with them.

The EZ Miser makes watering your chickens even easier!


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Early Frost . Lots of snow in 2014. My relatives used to say if the squirrla are gathering early then lots os snow is on the way. We have noticed that we can't go under an oak tree right now withoutr getting beaned in the head by acorns. The squirrls seem to be very busy and you can hear acorns hitting the ground all the time.!!
Comment by Donna Wed Aug 21 08:58:57 2013

I'm predicting a cold, early winter. Partly because we've had such mild winters for the past couple of years, partly because summer seems like it never really got started. I called someone for firewood and he said he never has orders for firewood this early but this year he has several people in line already. As for the acorn "test", I haven't seen any yet.

I also wish we had designed our coop better. The things that have been the hardest is that the eggs are not easy to get to and we have had to keep modifying the coop because of various predators (bears ripping off pieces, bobcats ripping through wire, raccoons pulling chicken legs through wire, etc).

Comment by Karyn Wed Aug 21 11:34:10 2013

From what I've gathered you seem to be a few weeks behind where we are as far as things ripening. I am sure your figs will ripen up in a few weeks.

I'm going to just take a wild guess and say first frost October 12th for your area just to see if I'm right.

Comment by Brian Wed Aug 21 13:42:02 2013
I think Fall may come early or Summer may hang on. I was going to ask what your forecast was, since you seemed so right on about the cool, wet Summer. We've already seen upper forties here a time or two.
Comment by Brandy Wed Aug 21 15:14:17 2013
Brandy --- I can't take credit for the prediction this spring. I'm on the email list of a local weather guru and it was his prediction. He hasn't made a real prediction for this fall, although he did mention that folklore says the first frost comes six weeks after the first katydid starts to call, which would put it early this year.
Comment by anna Sat Aug 24 11:46:34 2013

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