The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Sugar Sprint peas

Sugar sprint peas

Even after a decade, we're still trying to find the best edible-pod pea for our garden. But 2017 might be the year that makes the cut!

We started out growing Mammoth Melting Sugar, but those were really snow peas (to be eaten when the pod is flat) rather than sugar snaps (to be eaten when the pod is plump.) So we tried Sugarsnap and Super Sugar Snap, which did indeed give us that sweet crunch we were craving...but also quickly succumbed to a blight that wilted the plants from the bottom up before they were done bearing.

Enter Sugar Sprint. The pods are plump and sweet, the vines are short but prolific, and so far their reputed resistance to powdery mildew seems to be holding true. Maybe these will be the perfect peas for us?



Anna Hess's books
Want more in-depth information? Browse through our books.

Or explore more posts by date or by subject.

About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



Want to be notified when new comments are posted on this page? Click on the RSS button after you add a comment to subscribe to the comment feed, or simply check the box beside "email replies to me" while writing your comment.


I love Sugar Sprint! Love them so much they never get out of the garden except in my stomach!
Comment by Nayan Mon May 22 13:25:57 2017
Research shows they are HEAT TOLERANT so I will try some down here in Savannah.
Comment by Eric Mon May 22 17:04:08 2017





profile counter myspace



Powered by Branchable Wiki Hosting.