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Stocking up on sweet corn

Cutting corn off the cob

I might have gone a little overboard on our second-to-last sweet-corn planting this year. Some of the earlier plantings consisted of old seed that didn't sprout well, so I filled in a pretty big Sweet cornarea when the new seed came in the mail. But now I'm stuffing bags of sweet corn in every nook and cranny of our larger chest freezer, trying to decide if we need to plug in the smaller spillover freezer just for the sake of corn.

In the end, I froze five quarts of corn Thursday and I have nearly as many left to go before this planting is fully processed. The big question is --- will our final planting have time to mature, or will this weekend's forecast low of 44 turn into a first freeze nearly a month earlier than usual? (Yes, our lows are often at least 10 degrees below the forecast.)



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I know freezing is probably better taste-wise than canning, but have you considered canning at all? I don't have a chest freezer and the electricity usually goes out at least once a month (usually when it's a clear bright sunny day and due to some idiot crashing their car into a power pole), so I defaulted to canning. Not hard to do and so long as the jars are sealed properly they can probably last forever.
Comment by naYan Fri Sep 11 09:22:36 2015
So if you freeze 10 quarts of delicious home-grown corn, and a quart of corn is probably two meals for the two of you, that is only 20 meals until the sweet corn comes in again next year.
Comment by W. Fri Sep 11 09:48:09 2015
frozen is great for fresh flavor.drying is fine to keep a lot.the indians did it cause they did not have freezers.a coldweather solar drier can be made with any sort of big black inside container covered with glass or even plastic.leave ventilation fopr humid to escape(not big to allow cold in)if vent is in upper side the warm air pressure will keep cold out.i gotta husk itdrie it right on cobtake off cob when dry put in jute sack keep dry.i have kept the whole cobs in sacks just fine
Comment by willi Fri Sep 11 10:47:18 2015
How many ears does it take you to fill up a quart bag? Did you only grow Mirai this year? I'm looking forward to growing some next year. Although this is a hybrid, it's not GMO, right?
Comment by Rhonda from Baddeck Fri Sep 11 11:25:02 2015

Nayan --- Since 99% of the food we eat is homegrown, I go for flavor and nutrition first every time. Thus my lack of canning. I've found that even during a summer power outage, our chest freezer stays frozen solid if unopened with a quilt over the top for at least 24 hours before needing topped up by the generator.

  1. --- Well, we use the corn as more of a seasoning (sweetening agent really) so our ten quarts go a lot further than that. But maybe you're right --- maybe we can use more.... :-)

Willi --- Great input! We actually did dry some sweet corn on the cob last year because a friend gave us some that wasn't quite up to my culinary standards. (Yes, we're spoiled.) We just dried the corn by leaving it out on the drying racks for a while during the late summer heat. The goats adored the result! I doled out a little bit of dried sweet corn every few weeks whenever they needed a treat, and they would do just about anything for it.

Rhonda --- We go for the supersweets (hybrids), so they sure are delicious! This is Vision, but I have to say that all of the supersweet corns we've tasted are excellent. As for how many ears to fill a quart bag --- I should have counted! I filled my half-bushel basket to the brim with unhusked corn, which resulted in five quarts of kernels if that helps.

Comment by anna Sat Sep 12 15:47:27 2015

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