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Seed (and bulb) giveaway

Breadseed poppy flowersI finally got around to packaging up the seeds I've had drying on a shelf for the last few months, and realized I had enough interesting varieties for a second giveaway!  This month's selection includes:

  • Hungarian Breadseed Poppy --- Perfect for the stealth garden since these poppies are just as pretty as any flowers in your garden.  But then the pods swell to produce plenty of tasty poppyseeds for baking.
  • Clemson Spineless Okra --- Our favorite variety for flavor.  Okra flowers are so huge and showy that I could envision using them in your flower garden as an edible border --- a bit like Rose of Sharon.
  • Mung Beans --- Grow your own sprouting beans!  These are phenomenally easy to grow since bean beetles don't like them and you only have to pick the ripe pods a few times over the course of the summer.  We got about a cup of sprouting beans from one small bed, which will turn into quite a lot of meals.
  • Jersey Knight Asparagus --- One of our readers mentioned that his Jersey Knight "all-male" asparagus included one female plant, which prompted me to go outside and realize that one of my plants was female as well!  From what I've read on the internet, if you plant seeds from these females, you'll get nearly all male plants (with the associated higher yields), so I quickly gathered all the seeds I could.
  • Egyptian onionEgyptian Onions --- Yes, I do still have a heaping handful of top bulbs left, saved just for you!  One of my favorite (and most prolific) perennial vegetables.

To be entered in the giveway, just promote one of my ebooks in any way you choose.  I'm most in need of a review for the November volume of Weekend Homesteader, but you can post a link on Facebook or your blog, email your friends, tell your Mom, or do whatever suits your fancy.  No need to buy the ebooks to enter --- just email me and I'll gladly send you a free pdf copy of whichever ebook(s) you choose.

Leave a comment on this post by midnight on Tuesday, November 1, to let me know you've entered, and I'll pick one of you at random on Wednesday morning to win the seed package.  Thanks in advance for helping spread the word about my newest ebook!



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I recommended your self-sufficiency book to some friends in Boston. They're working their way slowly towards a set-up like yours out here on the west coast.
Comment by Bladerunner Sun Oct 30 12:32:37 2011
I haven't heard from you in a while --- glad to see you're still reading.
Comment by anna Sun Oct 30 13:10:09 2011
I was also surprised to see that my all-male asparagus had berries being produced. I chose to pull the berries off the plant so more energy can go to the crown. Some time in the future I may allow them to ripen, but not in the 1st year of the bed.
Comment by Fritz Mon Oct 31 06:55:56 2011
Interesting that your plants fruited the first year --- looks like you might be able to sample some spears next spring.
Comment by anna Mon Oct 31 08:59:28 2011

I promoted your November weekend homesteader ebook, the walden effect, and the chicken blog on my blog (see link below). I also posted a link to that blog post on my facebook page, twitter, google +, stumbleupon, and reddit. Thanks for sharing all your homesteading experiences.

http://pathtosustainableliving.com/2011/how-to-cook-a-whole-chicken-weekend-homesteader-review/#more-496

Comment by Kevin Mon Oct 31 22:16:33 2011

Hey there! Been reading through your blog (just discovered it today). I saw the contest, and as I'm a fan of anything free, I promoted you on my FB profile (2600 friends), as well as on Linked In (1600+ connections).

I really like what you're doing. I don't know that I could do complete self sufficiency in my area (city water, ordinances do not allow livestock, etc), but I look forward to reading your upcoming posts. I'm certain I can learn a few things from you.

(...and looking to see who won those seeds, LOL!) :)

Comment by Dawn Lambe Tue Nov 1 00:05:08 2011

Kevin --- Thanks for such a nice review, and for spreading the word!

Dawn --- Thanks for sharing! I'll be sure to enter you in the contest. :-)

Comment by anna Tue Nov 1 07:49:06 2011
I added an Amazon review to this month's issue. It's quite easy to review because there's nothing out there like it. Keep up the good work.
Comment by Brian Tue Nov 1 11:11:57 2011
Your kind review made my day!
Comment by anna Tue Nov 1 11:51:45 2011
Great info in this edition of Weekend Homesteader! I reviewed it on my blog: http://organiccityfarm.blogspot.com/2011/11/e-book-review-weekend-homesteader.html
Comment by John Amrhein Tue Nov 1 16:15:14 2011
Thanks for taking the time to write such a thoughtful review! I'm thrilled you got something out of the diversify your income chapter --- that's the one I struggled the most with making a weekend homesteader project.
Comment by anna Tue Nov 1 16:28:38 2011
I enter the contest by posting a link on my Facebook wall. I have been reading your blog since I heard you on a podcast. I get so much information from reading your post and even your archives. I am an avid researcher when I do any project.I use to use several sources. Now I just check your blog. Thanks for documenting everything you do,so well.
Comment by April Rainwater Tue Nov 1 21:47:26 2011
Thanks for entering, April! (And for reminding me I need to go over to the random number generator and see who won...)
Comment by anna Wed Nov 2 10:12:31 2011

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime