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Rise of the chives

Chives

Dividing and replanting our chives cluster in fall 2012 seems to have been a very good idea.  The three clumps did okay last year, but this spring, they're taking off early and quickly.  I was thrilled to realize this week that I now have several meals' worth of fresh, oniony goodness Omelet in trainingpoking out of the ground, with more on the way.

The only thing I would do differently is to cut back the dead growth this autumn rather than letting the top matter decay where it falls.  The new leaves pushed up right through the dead stems, so I had to pick a bit of straw-like material out of the greenery before we could eat it.  That didn't take any of the fun out of a homegrown omelet made from our eggs and chives and a bit of kefir-cultured sour cream, though.  Delicious and simple spring goodness!



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I are borrowing some chickens from a good friend of mine to help with bug control and kinda get my feet wet on chicken care while my chicks grow.

I LOVE the homegrown eggs, but is there ANY WAY to make peeling hard-boiled eggs any easier? Store bought eggs seem to separate just fine after an ice-water bath but these free range eggs are tough as nails....

Comment by Heather Thu Mar 13 11:28:42 2014
Emerging perennials look so dreamy. We just got 18 inches of snow here in VT so that sight seems a long way off. Thanks for your inspring posts!
Comment by Rebecca Beidler Thu Mar 13 11:37:16 2014
Heather, fresh eggs are extremely hard to peel. Store-bought eggs are usually older, so they peel easily.
Comment by Rhonda from Baddeck Thu Mar 13 14:37:46 2014

Heather --- My method of shelling homegrown hard-boiled eggs is to scoop them out with a spoon. Obviously, this isn't appropriate for deviled eggs, but it works great for egg salad, etc.

I've never tried this, but there's also a scientific approach using baking soda in the boiling water.

I hope that helps!

Comment by anna Thu Mar 13 15:55:37 2014
I found it easier to peel fresh eggs if I crack the pointed end first with a good wack. Then wack the round end. Then roll the egg over the counter pressing hard enough to crack the shell as you go. Last I place it back in the cold water to cool down.
Comment by mona Thu Mar 13 17:57:43 2014

I peel hardboiled eggs by holding them for a count of 30 seconds under the flow of cold water from the cold water tap while the egg is still hot. IE from the pan of hot water to the cold water tap. Then I tap them on the bottom of the sink, return them to beneath the tap water flow and start peeling them.

Makes peeling much easier.

Comment by Lee Mon Mar 24 16:26:18 2014

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime