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Rainy day transplanting

Cabbage transplantSome damp days, we rearrange our calendars and focus on indoors work.  But other times, we take advantage of the wet.

Transplanting

Wednesday was one of those happy-to-be-wet days.  I needed to move some Swiss chard, broccoli, and cabbage seedlings around to even out the spacing, and a drippy day promised to minimize the transplant shock.  Not only did I not have to water in the rearranged seedlings, the cloud cover meant they got a day of rest before having to deal with bright sunlight.

Don't try this at home, though, unless you're willing to get soaked and covered in dirt from the waist down.

Our chicken waterer keeps the coop dry and your flock healthy with POOP-free, non-spillable water.


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Awesome:) I'm finding that today is my ideal day to set out my broccoli seedlings for a bit of outdoor weather. It's a good temprature and overcast, so I won't fry them with too much sun first time out. I'll have their raised bed filled shortly and can't wait to be able to plant them out. (I've run out of room in my indoor mini greenhouses!) I really can't wait to be able to get everything planted out already :P
Comment by MamaHomesteader Thu Apr 19 14:35:10 2012

Yeah for the rain!

When you transplant/disrupt wet soil are you worried about damaging the soil structure?

Comment by Emily Thu Apr 19 14:57:05 2012

MamaHomesteader --- Our tomato sets are enjoying hardening off outdoors today too. I'm itching to put them in the ground, but am waiting until after the potential frosts Sunday and Monday.

Emily --- Excellent question. With my minimal method of transplanting, you don't need to worry much about disrupting soil structure. I just hand weed, pull back the earth to make a shallow depression, and pack the dirt back in around the seedling. I think it probably actually causes less soil structure damage than the more traditional method of transplanting into dry soil, but watering heavily.

I keep meaning to write a long post about how no-till gardens let you play outdoors even when the ground is wet. But I'll save that for another day!

Comment by anna Thu Apr 19 18:32:15 2012

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime