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Planting under the roof overhang

Tomato blight

In the midst of packing and preparing to move, I've let our garden go. Without pruning and tying up, the tomatoes out in the weather have predictably begun succumbing to blight.

Happy tomatoes

Contrast that to plants only ten feet away that have enjoyed the shelter of the roof overhang. These plants are green and vibrant and covered with ripening fruit.

Grapevine

The second story --- the grapes --- have shown a similar response to the roof overhang. Fruits that stay dry during rains are mostly rot-free while around 75% of the fruits exposed to the weather have succumbed to fruit rot.

Looks like a roof overhang is a very important gardening asset in wet climates...especially if you want to be as hands-off as I've been this year!



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Sometimes it is the unplanned experiments that yield the most interesting results...

It's widely said that luck happens when preparedness meets opportunity. So if the climate on your new homestead is wet as well, you should be prepared to put more fruit under overhangs.

Comment by Roland_Smith Sat Aug 5 08:18:27 2017
Why is it that plants not in the rain grow MUCH better?? Gotta wonder. Maybe you should plan for a hoop house so you can get things to eat??
Comment by John Sat Aug 5 13:14:43 2017