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Planting fig cuttings in the fall

Forest garden

Fig cuttingTwo more figs have found their way into our forest garden, due to Daddy's suggestion that we go ahead and plant our rooted cuttings so they can spend the winter getting established.  You can see them in the photo above as plump bags of leaves nestled amid the oilseed radishes.

Since I wanted to give the figs established garden soil raised well above our high groundwater (and since our extension of Figlandia is earmarked for tomatoes next year), I gave up two sites that I was considering for perennial mulch-producing plants.  Yes, I'm one of those people who plans dessert before the main course --- I just couldn't talk myself into planting a chop 'n drop mulch-producer when I could use the same space for two Chicago Hardy figs.

Now for the really tough decision, what should I name these two youngsters since I can't just call them by their variety descriptor?  Mark's rule is that we don't name chickens on our farm, but he never told me I couldn't name the trees....

My new paperback puts homesteading in perspective with easy tasks you can complete during your time off.


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How about: fig leaf don't give a fig ?

Comment by Errol Fri Nov 16 07:53:13 2012
Figaro?
Comment by Mizz Fri Nov 16 09:40:54 2012
I like Tarzan and Jane since they are part of the forest.
Comment by mona Fri Nov 16 10:19:02 2012

Characters from the marriage of Figaro might be fun.

We've named all of our trees. We bought two Black Tartanian cherries and two Stella cherries, named them "D'Artagnan" (sounded like Tartanian), "Athos", "Porthos", and "Aramis." When we bought sour cherries, they got named, "Cardinal Richelieu" and "Milady." When we bought two English walnuts, they were quickly named "Robin of Nutsley" and the "Sheriff of Nuttingham." We planted them in the "Shernut Forest." When we added pecans, those became "Friar Nut" and "Nut Little." When we added mulberries to the Shernut Forest, we named them "Fox Mulder" and "Dana Scully" and decided they were investigating whether or not the Shernut Forest was haunted or not as the legend suggested. The row of elderberries outlining the Shernut Forest were named the "Berry men"--with the exception of the one that got mowed down on planting. That one was named "Crew Cut" (it grew back). Our dwarf apple tree from a super sweet variety? "Sweet and Low."

My advice? Have some fun!

Comment by Dan Fri Nov 16 12:50:22 2012
I'm in DC for work and will be headed to our house in the suburbs to prune off cuttings to try and root. I'm so excited to 'follow along' with you and try to get my cuttings rooted over the Seattle winter. We are renting out our VA house since our move West - we can't sell, of course, until I make sure I get the backyard fig tree propagated and growing on our Oregon place, ha ha - how's that for fig economics!
Comment by Charity Fri Nov 16 14:16:17 2012

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime