The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Out of sight, out of mind

Erecting a quick hoop

The obvious purpose of quick hoops is freeze protection. However, I also find it useful to split up the garden into use-now and use-later areas by covering up the latter. Usually, out of sight, out of mind is a bad thing in the garden. But when you're stockpiling food for year-round use, a hidden harvest waiting for you in December can be a plus.

Winter garden

To that end, I covered 1.25 rows of kale, one row of lettuce, then about half a row of parsley and a quarter row of mustard greens Tuesday. If Mark's tri-tunnel works out, that'll sock away another row of kale and most of a row of brussels sprouts. A full winter feast! And we have roughly the same area left uncovered for November harvest. This is such a bountiful time of year.



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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What are your hoops made from? They look like common PVC?
Comment by NaYan Fri Nov 20 12:10:29 2015
NaYan --- Yep, they're PVC. If you missed it, you can read the full construction information in Weekend Homesteader: October.
Comment by anna Sat Nov 21 10:18:17 2015





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