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November Weekend Homesteader

November cover Chilly November weather drives even the most hardy homesteaders inside.  But the onset of the cold season doesn't mean the end of fun homesteading projects.  In Weekend Homesteader: November, you'll learn to rotate garden beds to keep diseases at bay, to store drinking water for use during power outages, to put an entire chicken to use in the kitchen, and to bring in cash without going to the office.

For those of you who are new to Weekend Homesteader, this series walks you through the basics of growing your own food, cooking the bounty, preparing for emergency power outages, and achieving financial independence.

I hope you'll consider splurging 99 cents to buy a copy of my newest ebook from Amazon's Kindle storeAnd many thanks in advance if you can find the time to write a brief review.

Weekend Homesteader paperback As usual, I'm also very glad to email you a free pdf copy to read if you don't have the spare cash, or just don't want to deal with downloading an app so you can read the ebook on your computer or phone.  Just email me with your request --- no strings attached.  Thanks for reading!



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I've only been reading you for a month or so and didn't know you had these books in the Kindle store. Once I get my Kindle, probably around Christmas, I'll pull several of them down.

How many do you have out?

Comment by Fritz Fri Oct 28 08:47:21 2011
This is volume 7 of Weekend Homesteader, but Mark and I also have a book about staring a microbusiness.
Comment by anna Fri Oct 28 11:33:15 2011

Hi there! I have really been enjoying your blog, I discovered it at some point when I was researching backyard chickening and I came across a link to your chicken waterers webpage. I decided to go back through and read your story from the beginning. For months now I have been engrossed in your tale and thoroughly enjoy reading about your success' and challenges that come your way. I generally don't post comments and prefer to just read along with the story, but the cover of this issue got the better of me. I am big fan of food pictures, even raw chicken I can deal with but cooked poultry without a golden skin always gets to me. Funny though, I can deal with raw eggs, but over-easy eggs are a no-go for me either (maybe I see it as under-cooked). Your ebook journey has been so interesting to me, but I have to scroll past this picture every time it comes up and just don't ready the text that is around it. Anyway, just some feedback from a hopeful future homesteader. Until then I live vicariously through those that have the opportunity to raise their own chicken, eat sun-warmed tomatoes and strawberries by the bowlful. Thank you for showing the masses what your world looks like! Jennifer

Comment by Jennifer Sat Sep 7 21:08:18 2013

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime