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Moundville Native American Festival

Mark was a good sport and let me take a photo of him with fur on his head, but the sunglasses spoiled the effect.Eight hundred years ago, Moundville, Alabama, was the home of a city of 10,000 people.  Once a year, a thousand of their descendants and random tourists descend on the mounds for a day of fun and edification.  Mark and I were thrilled to discover that the Native American Festival was being held the day before our cruise ship departed, and was nearly on our way.  The stars were aligned to bring us to another Native American mound.

While our visit to Moundville wasn't the same soul-bending experience as our trip to Serpent Mound, we still ended up rivetted.  The mounds themselves were amazing --- a dozen "small" ones and one sixty feet tall, the last of which we were allowed to climb.  But what really captured my attention was the educational booths set up for the festival.  I learned so much about Native American crafts that I'll have to turn it into a lunchtime series --- fire making, river cane baskets, pit-fired pottery!  Then there was the semi-authentic Native American food, an actual archaeological dig, and an astonishing number of vendors whose crafts should have been in a museum.  Despite hundreds of screaming kids, we stayed until the Alabama heat sent us scurrying for cover.  If you're ever close to Alabama in October, I highly recommend that you drop by the festival!


This post is part of our Moundville and Cruise to Mexico honeymoon series.  Read all of the entries:





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