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Cozumel, Mexico

Wild gherkin growing a fence in Mexico.Our second day on shore, we decided to take it easy --- our excursion to Uxmal had both worn us out and drained our wallets.  Instead, we got off the boat on the island of Cozumel and simply explored.  We ran the gauntlet, passing vendors trying to lure us into their booths, taxi-drivers anxious to take us for a ride, and time-share salesmen.

The water was the stunning turquoise you see in photographs and never quite believe and so clear that we could look down from the pier and see fish swimming several feet below.  I was intrigued by the plant life in a vacant lot, full of species I had no way of identifying.  One, though, especially caught my eye --- could that be Mexican Sour Gherkin climbing wildly over a fence?  I was 98% sure the plant was at least a relative, but decided against nibbling on its fruits.

Mark and me, posing against a replica Mayan statueAfter walking for a couple of hours in the heat, trying to reach an elusive museum, Mark found us an out of the way corner to relax against a replica Mayan statue.  We posed for photos, let a little Mexican rain sprinkle on our heads, then headed back to the ship for a stunning meal and a nap.

(Do you like my sombrero?  Mark and I got matching hats as our one concession to being tourists.  They should be great for weeding the garden next summer.)


This post is part of our Moundville and Cruise to Mexico honeymoon series.  Read all of the entries:





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