The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Midseason fruit flowers

Peach flowers

Peach ovaryThe peach flowers are mostly done.  A few are still pretty and pink like the one shown above, but most are starting to "undress", with dried up petals slipping off of fuzzy young fruits.

If you can see the ovaries left behind when the petals drop away, you know the tree has decided to mature the fruit.  Even if you can't quite make out of the ovary, it's a good sign if you notice "dead" flowers clinging to your fruit tree twigs after the petals are gone.  Of course, late freezes, self-thinning, and all kinds of other things could result in a fruitless year even if you see ovaries at this stage, but we can always dream.

Nanking cherry ovaryOur plum tree did drop all of its flowers, as I suspected it might since this was its first bloom year, but the nanking cherry bushes seem to be keeping theirs.  So do the lower limbs of the pear trees, despite my topworking.

Old pear flowers
Apple flower buds

Still lots of floral excitement left to come in our perennial plantings this spring.  Our Blueberry flower budsVirginia Beauty apple opened up a few flowers this week, and several clusters are still in the bud stage.  Meanwhile, one of our gooseberries is also well laden.

Gooseberryflower.jpg

Next up, blueberries!

Sick of cleaning out filthy, traditional waterers?  Our chicken waterers are always POOP-free.


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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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Your peaches are finished before your blueberries come in?

This is the first year my peach tree is in bloom, but it still has a few flowers and a few very small fuzzy fruits beginning. The blueberries began blooming more than a month ago, and the berries are almost mature now.

Comment by Sara Sun Apr 1 10:41:30 2012

Here in southern Oregon, my 3 plum trees have just come into full bloom. It has been raining like mad, so I am not sure if the bees/bugs will be able to polinate much for fruiting this season.

My apple trees, asian pears, cherrys, strawberry plants and blueberrys still have buds plumping up.

Rasberrys are starting to leaf out. This is the first year for red current, so I noticed it is changing but not sure if it will be leaves or flowers.

I love this time of year.

Comment by Mona Sun Apr 1 12:01:08 2012

Sara --- Very interesting that your flowers opened in the opposite order compared to mine! I would say you might have a different type of blueberry, but these are actually rabbiteye blueberries (we're on the northern limit of their range) which is almost definitely what you have way down south. So, maybe the answer is that blueberries and peaches use different cues to decide whether to bloom? For example, if one uses day length and another chill days, they might bloom in the opposite order in different places.

Mona --- Sounds like quite an orchard you have! I hope you get enough of a break from the rain to get fruits. I've read that if it rains constantly while the flowers are open, some trees might not get pollinated, but have never experienced that here.

Comment by anna Sun Apr 1 13:10:14 2012





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