The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Jimsonweed

Jimsonweed flower

Did you know that the common garden weed Jimsonweed was named after the Virginia settlement of Jamestown? The name dates back to 1676 when British soldiers sent to squash Bacon's Rebellion instead ended up enduring an eleven-day hallucinogenic episode due to dining on Jimsonweed leaves.

I'll be pulling these volunteers out shortly, but wanted to enjoy the evening-opening, moth-pollinated flowers first.



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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You made me curious - off to Wikipedia I went. The leaves have a 'bitter and nauseating taste' so I wonder why they ate them at all. And the fatal dose is not much more than the 'medicinal' dose, so I'm surprised that the troops didn't drop like flies after eating it. The plant is 'foul-smelling' but the flowers are 'fragrant' - what a contradiction! Among its various names is "Moonflower" - do you know if it's the same as the Moonflower that's commercially available?
Comment by Rhonda from Baddeck Tue Jun 12 17:28:12 2018
Rhonda --- I'm pretty sure the Moonflower most people buy is a morning-glory relative. At least that's what we planted when I was a kid!
Comment by anna Wed Jun 13 09:15:18 2018





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