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First fig and next wave of raspberries

Ripening fig

Our first fig ran nearly three weeks late this year, ripening up on September 18.  Even then, we only had the one until today, when I hope to bring in enough figs to make it worth our while to roast some.  Good thing that possible frost passed us by or this would have been a one-fig year!  Instead, with autumn warming back up through the beginning of October, we may get to enjoy gallons of them.

Red raspberriesThe blueberries are finally slowing down, but another row of raspberries is ripening to take their place.  It's a bit odd how our two plantings of red raspberries act entirely differently even though they are all clones of one Caroline plant.  The row closer to the north-facing hillside (meaning they get a lot of shade, even in the summer) ripened up their fall berries nearly a month before the sunnier row, but the shady berries were considerably smaller.  The berries turning color now are huge and copious, promising a bowlful per day for our favorite dessert.

What fruits are you enjoying this week?



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Funny you should ask. I had a craving for fresh pineapple, and woke up Sunday morning and had to go right out to the store to get it. Too bad we can't get THAT to grow around here! LOL
Comment by Emily from Bristol Wed Sep 24 08:46:21 2014
Have you had any issues with pests in your raspberries? If so, I'd like to hear how you deal with them, specifically spotted wing drosophilia. My berries were completely infested with them this year. I ended up cutting off all the berries and giving them to the chickens in an attempt to - hopefully - reduce the population next year. Or maybe you cover this in your naturally pest free book?
Comment by Daniel Wed Sep 24 10:26:53 2014

Emily --- One of our readers in Florida grows them, using the tops of storebought pineapples. He gave us one to try, but I was too lazy to take it in for the winter. If you're willing to spend two years babying a potted plant, though, it's supposed to be possible....

Daniel --- I have a high tolerance for pests that don't really do much damage other than cosmetics. We do have fruit flies on our raspberries (although I haven't tried to ID them to species), but I just ignore them. It does help to always pick the fruit every day, and to toss any fruits that get away from you to the chickens rather than letting them rot on the bush.

Comment by anna Wed Sep 24 19:22:55 2014
The issue I discovered with SWD is that unlike the average fruit fly that lays eggs in ripe fruit, the SWD lays in unripe fruit. So by the time the raspberries ripen, the maggots are alive and well inside the berry. I'm sure we ate quite a number before we realized this, and that didn't seem to do us any harm. However, once we realized, it was more than we mentally wanted to handle.
Comment by Daniel Thu Sep 25 10:17:28 2014

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime