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Filling out spotty pea rows

Spring weeding

The cold snap has passed, and now warm weather is once again tempting me out into the garden. Good thing too because it's finally time to plant carrots and peas.

Soaking peas

This year, I'm trying a hybrid approach to my pea-planting. I was excited by how well inside-started seeds did in the garden last spring...but a bit daunted by the idea of starting several flats of peas to hit our full quota. But what if I direct-seed the rows, then fill in gaps with inside-started seedlings?

To that end, I filled about two-thirds of a flat with peas (the other third going to basil and tomatoes) and soaked the rest of the packet to go straight in the ground. Of course, you probably already see the problem with this plan, which I only noticed as I wrote this post. Inside-sprouted seeds will come up significantly faster and may need to hit the garden before soil-started seeds have poked their heads above ground. Oh well, live and learn!



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I've found that if I put seeds like peas, beans, and corn between damp paper towels and let them sit in a warm place, it really speeds up germination. Once you see the rootlets starting to break away from the seed, that's the time they should go in the ground. It speeds up emergence to pre-germinate them in this way.
Comment by Ray A Wed Mar 22 16:34:32 2017

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime