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Fall fig flavor

Fall figsOur fig tree has changed a lot in the last month.  We missed a couple of frosts by a hair, and the tree could clearly tell that its growing time was limited.  So it began ripening up figs right and left, holding back some water and turning the skins more purple in the process.

I actually prefer the taste of these late fall figs --- they're less watery, so the flavors are already concentrated even before I cut them in half and roast them in the toaster oven.  But I had to tweak my roasting technique.  Waiting until I hear juices sizzle in the pan will now result in burnt figs, so I instead roast until the tops begin to look dry.

Yes, we're still obsessed.  No, I still can't imagine ever having enough homegrown figs.  Our weekly quarts of fall raspberries are nearly as good, though.

Our chicken waterer is the mess-free solution to backyard chicken-keeping.



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I have not yet had the pleasure of eating homegrown figs, and have never personally roasted any. However, maybe you could 'tent' the figs while they roast (kind of like you would a turkey), so that you will seal in more moisture. Hopefully that will leave you with juicy figs, instead of dry fig jerky. ;)
Comment by Devon Gluza Thu Oct 25 10:42:18 2012

Hi Anna,

I really enjoy your site.

Nice.

Gotta try to grow figs :).

John

Comment by john Thu Oct 25 12:00:33 2012
Devon --- That would be a good idea, except I like roasting figs specifically to drive off the excess water and concentrate the flavor. The same technique works well with other watery fruits and vegetables, like late fall tomatoes. I highly recommend you hunt some down and give them a try!
Comment by anna Thu Oct 25 13:23:24 2012

My late figs were mostly dry and inedible, unfortunately. But my summer figs were perfect -- your figs are probably watery because they're getting too much water (I know you're in a wet spot!). Mine are grown in pots, so that's not a problem for me.

I share your love of figs -- I'm tempted to get a greenhouse on their behalf. Lee Reich has his trees in a greenhouse -- they share space with seedlings in the spring and greens in the fall and winter.

Comment by BeninMA Fri Oct 26 15:19:42 2012