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Egyptian onions for sale

Basket of Egyptian onion top bulbsI seem to have slightly over-planted our Egyptian onions this year.  I only put in three small beds...and then three more patches sprang up from compost piles where I'd tossed the excess bulbs.  The result was so many onions that I didn't even put a dent in the population by pulling whole plants to eat over the winter, and now that it's time to harvest the top bulbs, I'm officially overwhelmed.  This basket is less than a third of the harvest!

Rather than composting the top bulbs (a method that clearly failed last year), I'm going to sell them in big bunches to anyone willing to start a good-sized Egytian onion patch.  I don't really want to get into the retail side of mailing off a few bulbs here and there, but if you're a regular commenter and just want a tiny start, email me and I'll likely oblige you.  You definitely want these plants in your garden if you grow in zones 3 through 9.  Sorry, I can't mail them outside the U.S.



Sold out!


To order, click on the paypal button above to buy 100 top bulbs for $25 (with free shipping.)  100 bulbs will weigh approximately 5 ounces and will be enough to start one good-sized bed that will feed one or two average people.  Your package will contain small, medium, and large bulbs.



Sold out!


If you really want to feed an army (and help me get rid of these top bulbs as quickly as possible), you can buy 500 top bulbs for $75 (with free shipping.)  If so, click this button instead.

Egyptian onion top bulbsOnce you receive your bulbs, plant the Egyptian onions as soon as possible in good garden soil in full sun.  The very top of the bulb should be poking out of the ground, but the rest should be submerged.  Some people recommend planting them a foot apart, but I've found that my plants do well in raised beds spaced only about three inches between centers.  Leave the plants alone for a few months, then you should be able to start harvesting green onions in the middle of the fall through the winter.

To maintain a perennial patch, cut only every second or third leaf, making sure that the plant has enough green leaves to continue growing.  You can also dig up entire bulbs in the winter to use in recipes that call for leeks, but you'll want to let all your plants grow the first year.  By this time next year, your plants should be putting up top bulbs, each of which can be planted to expand your patch.  As long as you don't get too greedy and overharvest, Egyptian onions will soon become your most dependable --- and easiest --- vegetable.

If Egyptian onions aren't up your alley, but you still want to support the work of the Walden Effect, check out our homemade chicken waterer.


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Not clear on what happens to last year's bulbs. Do they keep going or die off?
Comment by Errol Wed Jul 7 08:33:06 2010
They keep going, and will actually split off a few little side bulbs if you haven't harvested the leaves too hard during the year.
Comment by anna Wed Jul 7 10:35:05 2010
If we weren't about to pack all our belongings and move cross country I'd be taking you up on your offer. I'm hopeful that our new place will have lots of room for gardening!
Comment by Fostermamas Wed Jul 7 21:17:52 2010
Don't despair! I suspect we'll be similarly overwhelmed next year. Have a safe move!
Comment by anna Thu Jul 8 15:50:53 2010

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime