The Walden Effect: Homesteading Year 5. Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Homestead Blog

Innovations:

Homesteading Tags

Recent Comments



Blog Archive

User Pages

Login

About Us

Submission guidelines

Store


Beeswax graft sealant

Grafting waxI decided to take the plastic bags off my pear grafts since it's been getting so hot I was afraid the scionwood would cook.  The beeswax has done a remarkably good job of staying put...except for on top of one of the four pieces of scionwood.  I thought I might have just missed that spot when initially dabbing on the wax, but photographic evidence is to the contrary.

There's quite a difference in vibrancy between the scionwood that lost its cap and the one that retained its cap.  The former looks a bit shriveled up and the bud appears to have tried to open and failed, while the wax-capped twig looks plumper and content to wait until the rest of the tree starts leafing out.

Hopefully one piece of scionwood will be enough to change the variety on that pear.  I don't expect to see any growth for a month or two since grafted scionwood often waits to wake up until after the rootstock has already put out leaves.  Stay tuned for further updates.

Our chicken waterer keeps chickens healthy with POOP-free water.


Want to be notified when new comments are posted on this page? Click on the RSS button after you add a comment to subscribe to the comment feed, or simply check the box beside "email replies to me" while writing your comment.


Try soaking a small piece of cloth in molten wax, and put it of top of the scionwood when it has cooled down enough. Fold the cloth down and tie a string around it so it can't come off.
Comment by Roland_Smith Sat Mar 17 14:43:24 2012
Roland --- Very good idea! I suspect it might be too late for this piece of scionwood --- I didn't notice it until it had dried out. But I think I'll try that the next time since it does sound like it'll add more structural integrity.
Comment by anna Sat Mar 17 19:58:09 2012