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A halfway successful permaculture weekend

Daddy and tomatoes

If you want to go to a conference 45 minutes from your father's house and want to squeeze in a visit at the same time, do you attend the conference first and visit afterwards, or do you have family time right off the bat?  Mark's gut said the latter, and I think he was right, since I wanted to see Daddy more than I wanted to learn at the conference...and some weeks I can't manage even one night away from home.  After a wonderful visit on Friday, I managed to net two whole hours of sleep, and that only came once I gave up on the bed in the guest room and on the quiet and comfortable couch and went to squeeze myself into the back seat of the car.  (Yes, I am the world's weirdest sleeper and really like small spaces.  I should have brought my tent.)

BuffetAnyway, that's all a long way of explaining why --- even though Mark and I were itching to hear Tradd's newest talks and to check out the South Carolina Organic Growing Conference --- we only managed to enjoy a delicious lunch there before heading home.  On two hours of sleep, even pastured pigs, medicinal mushrooms, and biointegrated homesteads didn't sound as lovely as returning to the peace and quiet of our own farm.

I did get one of the nicest February tomato plants I've ever seen out of the weekend, though, plus some cuttings and a rooted sprout from Daddy's Brown Turkey fig.  That brings us up to five fig varieties we're trialling for cold hardiness here at the edge of their range.  More on what I'm doing with my new figs in a later post.



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hi; We live in Franklin Co. VA and have a turkey fig that just hasn't done well, I moved it to a new location this winter and also got a small fig from a neighbor who has figs but don't know the variety. I have seen them do well here but can't find out the variety. The guy that I got my last one from piled old hay around the base of his figs and then covered them with tarps with rocks holding them down. So I have done that with my newly planted ones. Other people don't go to that trouble and still have success so it is a mystery so far. gill http://sunnybrookfarmus.blogspot.com/

Comment by Gill Mon Mar 3 09:25:41 2014
We went to a class in the next state over learning how to harvest a whole pig at home. It was a fabulous class but it was HORRIBLE the way I couldn't go out to check on my plants or pet my animals! Honestly with all the great information I took away I never want to be that far away from the farm again.
Comment by Julianne Wed May 7 12:13:17 2014

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime