The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Chicken Potstickers

Wrappers:
Chicken potstickers

  • 2 c. flour
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 3/4 c. boiling water

Combine flour and salt in the food processor.  Add the boiling water and blend for about 15-20 seconds.  Knead for 2 minutes until the dough is smooth.  Rest for 30 minutes under a towel.

Filling:

  • 1 c. chopped cabbage
  • 1/8 c. spinach or swiss chard
  • 1/2 lb. ground chicken meat*
  • 1/4 tsp. ginger
  • 1 tbsp. green onion tops (2-3 onion leaves)
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. sugar
  • 1/8 tsp. pepper
  • 1/2 tbsp. light soy sauce
  • 1/2 tbsp. vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp. oil
  • 3/4 tsp. cornstarch

Put all filling ingredients in the food processor (no need to wash it from the dough) and blend until well blended. 

Use a pasta machine to roll out the potsticker dough:

  1. Cut dough into eighths.
  2. Put each piece of dough through the machine on the thickest setting.
  3. Put each piece of dough through the machine on the third thickest setting.
  4. Put each piece of dough through the machine on the second to thinnest setting.

Then form the potstickers by cutting dough into square pieces about two inches on a side.  Spoon about a tablespoon of filling into the center of the square (enough so that the potsticker is plump but isn't hard to close) and pull up four corners to the top and pinch them together.  Then pinch the seams closed.  Continue until all of potstickers have been made.

Heat up two large skillets on medium-high.  Pour enough oil into each skillet to cover the bottom and place the potstickers in the skillets.  Cook for about one minute until the bottoms are brown.  Then pour about 1/4 to 1/2 inch of water into each skillet, cover, lower heat to low, and cook for 8 minutes until done..  (You can use chicken broth instead of water, which is even tastier but makes the potstickers stick to the pan.)

Serves 2-3 as a main course.

* We often find ground chicken or turkey reduced to a very low price in the grocery store.  When we do, we buy it all, pack it in half pound sections, and freeze it.  It thaws very quickly in the microwave and is a very easy meat to cook with.



Read other posts about killing and eating your own chickens:

And don't miss Mark's homemade chicken waterer invention.





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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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