The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Wild edibles as tea

Naturalist with multiflora rose

Hidden teaJenn and I enjoyed an inspiring naturalist-led hike at Burr Oak State Park on the equinox. Our fearless leader not only brewed teas for us to taste, she also stashed jugs of the refreshing liquid along the trail so we could sample each type as we ambled along.

My favorite was spicebush, made from the berries, twigs, and leaves of the aforementioned bush. I hadn't known the berries were edible, but it turns out you can cook them up into jam. I sampled one on its lonesome and found it too strong for fresh eating, although the first bite had hints of avocado and was intriguing to me.

Wild tea hike

Jewelweed seedsRunner-up teas included sumac (from the berries), sassafras (from the roots --- too strong for my tastes), and multiflora rose (from the hips --- very mild and I would have liked to taste it without the sweetening).

We also sampled jewelweed seeds, which were nutty but had too much of an aftertaste for me and Jen. The green seeds weren't quite so strong and might be a better start. Perhaps that's what the chickens preferred too?



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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Naturalists' perspectives inspire us and open our understandings of time and place, and of our forebears. Hopefully, our younger friends and kin can also appreciate this! The herbal walk you took and sampled is proof that people who know these things are the key to the future.

Stray Leaves, Selected Essay from Sanctuary Magazine, the Massachusetts Audubon monthly, also mentions lamb's quarter seeds that were ground into a meal. This little book is comforting, in times of stress. Just as gathering walks are, too. All "food for thought"--Preserve our Wildlife Sanctuaries!!

Comment by adrianne Tue Sep 25 07:55:50 2018

Thank you for going with me. I really enjoyed it and I am glad you did too. The spice bush was my favorite too and I would love to have more of that tea for sure. Look forward to our next adventure.

JenW~

Comment by bleueaugust Sun Sep 30 08:19:51 2018

Thank you for going with me. I really enjoyed it and I am glad you did too. The spice bush was my favorite too and I would love to have more of that tea for sure. Look forward to our next adventure.

JenW~

Comment by bleueaugust Sun Sep 30 08:20:53 2018





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