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Storing drinking water in canning jars

Canning jars
The biggest problem with storing drinking water is that it takes up a lot of room....


Weekend Homesteader paperbackEvery good homesteader has a hundred or so quart size jars.  Jars take up the same space whether they are full of beautiful fruits and veggies or empty.

A great way to store water is in those jars once you use your precious preserves.  Water and preserves need the same storage requirements --- dark, cool, rotated often --- so you can put those shelves to use in the off season to store drinking water for emergency power outages.


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Great idea. I typically fill a jar with water when I don't have a full canner. This keeps the jars from rattling together and in my mind makes the process more efficient since I have to heat up that space anyway and water is a better heat sink than air.

Up to now, it was just a jar. Now I'm going ot start putting a boiled lid on it so it seals. This will fill that empty jar and make sure the water is sterile.

Comment by Fritz Tue Nov 15 12:32:42 2011
duh....why didn't I think of that?
Comment by fostermamas Tue Nov 15 17:39:15 2011
I was thinking about that idea as I read Kathleen's tip. I guess, the question is whether you want to "waste" a canning lid to ensure the sterility of the contents. I might be tempted to put the water-filled jar in the canner, but use an old lid that no longer ensures a seal, then just plan to rotate the water every six months to a year as you would with an unsealed container.
Comment by anna Tue Nov 15 18:02:07 2011
Fostermamas --- For the same reason I didn't --- it's such an outside the box, awesome idea. :-)
Comment by anna Tue Nov 15 18:05:32 2011
Years ago, the Mother Superior of our local convent was my patient and once presented me with the gift of a can labeled "Dehydrated Water." Directions: just add water and stir.
Comment by doc Tue Nov 15 18:09:05 2011
The fact that the gift is funny (to me too :-) ) just shows how accustomed we are to having clean water flow out of our taps on demand....
Comment by anna Wed Nov 16 09:50:34 2011

You know how dangerous dihydrogenmonoxide is, don't you?

Comment by Roland_Smith Wed Nov 16 16:26:30 2011
I didn't read the whole website, and their FAQ wasn't all that helpful. Is that the chemical that can seep into foods from the canning lids? If so, I wouldn't be terribly worried from this application --- properly canned food (or water for that matter) would never touch the lid.
Comment by anna Wed Nov 16 16:43:42 2011
Dihidrogen monoxide is also known as water. The site is a joke to show how outragous warnings can be sometimes and to point out that even common things such as water have killed more people than exotic stuff has. I am sure even if you don't remember that you ran across Jim with a flyer from that site back at swat.
Comment by Rebecca Wed Nov 16 20:59:30 2011
Ah, yes. That would explain why my quick skim of the website couldn't turn up any facts.... :-) And here I thought it was just badly designed.
Comment by anna Thu Nov 17 08:37:50 2011