The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Squeeze Wrench proves itself

using a squeeze wrench to replace a distributor cap on a Toyota 1994 Carolla


I think it's been over 10 years since I first bought the Squeeze Wrench at a Flea Market and today it finally got a chance to prove itself.

The Toyota Corolla seems to have a misfire, and my first thought was to replace the distributor cap and rotor.

Adding a small extension to the Squeeze Wrench made for a near perfect distributor cap removal tool and flipping it around lets you tighten in the same cramped position.



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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Before replacing the distributor cap and rotor, you should really test the sparkplugs, HT leads and coil.

When you take out the sparkplugs to test them, check that they aren't black or wet and that the spark gap is correct. If you don't get a spark, the distributor could be corroded at the connection to that plug or the HT lead could have failed, or the connector between HT lead and sparkplug has corroded.

Comment by Roland_Smith Fri Jan 4 17:13:25 2013





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