The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

No vacancies in the curing racks

Harvesting butternutsI've been meaning to bring the onions in from the curing racks, but I've been cooking them up into soup so fast that it hardly seems worth it.  Blighted tomatoes aren't quite as sweet as tip-top homegrown should be, so I double the onions in our harvest soups to raise us up to the sugar levels we prefer.  As a result, we've used up nearly half of the year's onions just a month after harvesting.

Vegetable curing racksMeanwhile, the first butternuts are ready to come off the ground and get some airflow before being packed away for the winter.  So squash have taken the place of onions on two of our six shelves, and more will be moving to the drying racks next week.

Which is all a long way of saying --- there's been no vacancy on the garlic curing racks ever since they were built.  They continue to be one of the best farm innovations of this year.

Mark's all-time favorite farm innovation is his chicken waterer, which provides POOP-free water for thousands of backyard flocks around the world.


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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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