The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Lackluster winesaps

Stamen Winsap apples on a table


It's been hard to find a good Stayman Winesap apple this year.

The one on the right is the type we've been seeing most. The missing red color indicates a lack of ripening. We found the one on the left today and it tastes more mature, but it's the only source so far.

A fruit stand guy told me yesterday that all the rain we got back in the summer caused the trees to produce too many leaves which blocked part of the sun and prevented full ripening.



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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My trees dont really stop growing in winter, most are actually evergreen for me. With 2-3 growth cycles in a year, I have a big problem with old leafs holding on. In spring and fall I have to remove leaves or most fruit gets to much shade.
Comment by t Sat Oct 20 22:42:50 2012
I've never had a good Winesap(they've all been really bland) -- although all the apples I've had came from the same orchard, so that may be their fault. Of the Heirlooms, Golden Russets are the ones that have really stood out to me.
Comment by BeninMA Mon Oct 22 01:45:43 2012





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