The Walden Effect: Homesteading Year 5. Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Homestead Blog

Innovations:

Homesteading Tags

Recent Comments



Blog Archive

User Pages

Login

About Us

Submission guidelines

Store


Kubota X900 update

Kubota update

We've used the Kubota X900 twice now and it continues to exceed our expectations.

I'm thinking of deleting the wire mesh barrier between the dump bed and the seats to make hauling lumber easier.

Those two 2x4's sticking out hit something solid and busted a bungee cord and if the mesh barrier was gone I could have strapped them onto the front roll bar.



Want to be notified when new comments are posted on this page? Click on the RSS button after you add a comment to subscribe to the comment feed, or simply check the box beside "email replies to me" while writing your comment.


What about just strapping it to the two roof bars front to back?
Comment by Marco Wed Aug 10 23:44:21 2016
We have two trailers that we use for hauling behind our Polaris. One is used for small loads on the property. The other is larger and used when we are cutting trees or go off the property to pick up manure or materials.
Comment by Linda Thu Aug 11 08:40:31 2016
I wonder if that cage is whiplash protection, designed to be used with a helmet? I know you guys probably don't drive that fast...
Comment by Chris Thu Aug 11 14:18:10 2016
That cage is there to keep Kubota's lawyers happy. Remove at your own risk!
Comment by Eric Thu Aug 11 17:47:56 2016

You're right Marco, we could strap some lumber up high like that.

A trailer might be an option for us after we do a few more loads of rock.

Chris....I'll bet you're right about whiplash protection....I got up to 4 mph on a rare straight away by the chicken coop but other than that we will most likely never drive much faster.

Comment by mark Thu Aug 11 18:19:57 2016

The barrier could be there for several reasons;

  1. By legal mandate
  2. To strengthen the roll cage against shear under a sideways load.
  3. As a worst-case protection (maximum speed collision while carrying a highly stacked but not interlocking load)

Whiplash protection seems unlikely to me. A higher seat with head-rest would seem a better solution in such a case. And what are the chances of having a high-speed rear-end collision in a vehicle that is presumably not road-legal?

In cases 1 or 2 I would expect the screen to be non-removable (e.g. welded in place). But I think it's removable; there is an option to have a completely enclosed cabin with a roof and windows all around.

So just like the roll-cage and safety belts, the mesh barrier is probably there for reason 3; to prevent a worst-case scenario. I'd leave it in place. It's not that the chances of this happening are high, it's that the consequences can be so dire when it does.

In engineering it is customary to to a Failure Mode and Effect Analysis ("FMEA"). This means thinking up a list of things that could go wrong (failures) during the operation of the machine/vehicle. For each failure you estimate the chance of it happening on e.g. a scale of 1 to 5 (where 5 is a certainty) and the severity of the consequences when it does on a scale of e.q. 1 to 10 (where 10 is probably loss of life). The issues where the product of chance times severity are higher than a certain threshold need to be solved/mitigated before a machine is allowed to go into production.

The roll cage is there to prevent the vehicle from crushing you in case the vehicle rolls over. But note that if you're not wearing the seat belt, you could fall out and then get crushed by the roll cage, which is not an improvement. This is a well-known problem with e.g. forklifts which are relatively easy to tip over when making a high-speed turn.

Comment by Roland_Smith Sun Aug 14 06:24:52 2016