The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Heated kennel pad safety

heated kennel pad update and safety

Reading the reviews on Lucy's Lectro Heated Kennel Pad taught me that the device has been known to malfunction, causing the thermostat in the pad to keep it on all the time creating a situation where it's too hot and will most likely burn out and stop working.

Lucy has been using hers a lot lately, which makes me happy knowing she's comfortable, but I've started testing it once a week by putting my hand on it to see if it's too hot or burned out.



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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I haven’t tried this because I don’t have the need. If the doghouse doesn’t have a floor couldn’t you dig a hole and fill it with horse manure or whatever is available to you. Then cover it with a little dirt and straw and then the doghouse. I know this is used in some cold frames. I don’t know why it wouldn’t work to heat the ground under your dog. Just a thought.

Ned

Comment by Ned Mon Nov 4 14:29:38 2013





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