The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Grow Fruit Naturally

Grow Fruit NaturallyGrow Fruit Naturally by Lee Reich is a good starter book for those interested in growing organic fruit, and will definitely be a handy reference to keep on my bookshelf for the next few years.  It's actually quite similar to the same author's The Pruning Book, both in pros and cons.

On the positive side, Growing Fruit Naturally is linear and hits all of the salient points concisely.  On the negative side, despite the title, the book really covers only mainstream organic methods, not the cutting edge permaculture techniques of nurturing full-ecosystem health that you'll find in The Holistic Orchard.

In the end, I recommend the book for beginners, and for intermediate fruit-growers like myself who still need a reminder every year before they prune their grapes.  On the other hand, if you've been orcharding for a decade, you might want to give this book a pass.

The Weekend Homesteader covers care of the easiest fruits, along with other beginner tasks to guide you toward low-stress self-sufficiency.


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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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