The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Gardening by zones

Garden transitioning from spring to summer

I always plan to maintain the garden by zones...but I get behind and have to spend the rest of the summer rushing around to catch up. This year, I've (mostly) managed the task by (mostly) planting cohorts of vegetables in the same area each week.

Berry rows

The benefit is profound --- full areas like the one shown above that are weeded, mulched, and pruned all at the same time. There's nothing quite like walking by a row of fruit on the way to the composting toilet every day and knowing there's nothing that needs to be done in that zone...except enjoy the first black raspberries.

Shaggy garden

Of course, the downside of zone gardening is that each area looks pretty shaggy by the time I get back to it. I had to zoom way in on the mule garden to make it look at all attractive --- from a distance, the area is simply a sea of green.

On the plus side, the mule garden is pretty much all that's on my list for next week. So I should have it back shipshape in no time.



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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