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Coop scoop

scooping good dirt from bottom of coop

We scraped enough chicken dirt from the used pallet chicken coop to fill multiple wheel barrows.

It was the total from 4 years of accumulation, and it gave Anna the feeling of being at the beach.



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well, I see I am not the only one who gets silly happy about great compost... but you must go to a totally different kind of beach than I am used to....😊
Comment by deb Fri Apr 24 19:51:20 2015
I know it is recommended to ferment poultry manure for about a year for fertilizing edibles..but can you use fresh manure/leaves to mulch/fertilize trees or in my case sapplings? I just planted a bunch of 1 foot Black Hills Spruce/White Spruce and want to mulch them with an abundance of chicken/duck muck (leaves/manure) that I have. Would you recommend this or not?
Comment by Dave Sat Apr 25 22:22:31 2015

deb --- Yeah, Mark didn't get what I was talking about either. It's just that amazing relaxed, happy feeling you get after hauling so many loads of black gold...or sitting and watching the ocean for hours. :-)

Dave --- In the winter you would probably get away with it. But I wouldn't recommend it now that the growing season has commenced. I've mulched woody perennials with moderately fresh deep bedding for years, but I would always apply it in the winter, when roots were dormant and the bedding had a couple of months to compost on the soil surface before things started to grow again. As a result, I thought the bedding mixture was pretty innocuous...until I applied it directly under a perennial in the growing season last year and saw some burn! Now I figure, better safe than sorry.

On the other hand, if the trees are newly planted, you know exactly where their roots are. So you could presumably spread the manurey bedding in a donut a bit beyond the root zone. Then, when the roots get there, they'll have yummy compost to eat up.

Comment by anna Sun Apr 26 07:17:17 2015

One very unique homestead, $1,500 per acre, the opportunity of a lifetime