The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

American persimmon grafting

Grafting supplies

Grafted persimmonOf the two American persimmon grafts that took last year, one is puttering along very slowly while the other has exploded (see photo to the left). The scionwood on this variety is I-94, and despite the less than inspiring name the plant made enough growth for me to cut a bit of scionwood last winter. (Yes, all of the new greenery in the photo grew post-trimming.)

Rewinding back to the winter, I stuck the scionwood in the fridge in a ziploc bag to wait for persimmon-grafting season --- late May to early June when the rootstock plants are vigorously growing. Then I pulled out my shears and knife and turned two more seedling trees into a named variety.

Summer persimmon grafting

I have to admit that I'm not convinced this year's grafts will take. The scionwood was on the small side and it dried out a bit in the fridge despite its bag. But there's no reason not to try. And, if all else fails, I should be able to get some excellent scionwood off that I-94 plant this coming winter for 2017 grafting.



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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