The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Steering clear of invasives

Japanese Honeysuckle flowersDid you ever wonder which out-of-town plants are okay to put in your flower bed and which ones are likely to slip their leash and turn into the next kudzu infestation?  The Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center has an extensive list of cultivated plants known to be invasive along with non-invasive alternatives. 

Say you're at the local nursery and notice a pretty honysuckle for sale --- should you buy it?  Stop by the website and you'll see that Japanese Honeysuckle is an invasive, but that you can choose between 11 alternatives which fill a similar niche.  Just what I've been looking for!



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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I have an infestation of Japanese Honeysuckle, along with another invasive called Wintergreen. I'm working hard to rid the property of these but sometimes it's as if I'm making NO progress.
Comment by Syble Wed Jun 3 12:42:07 2009
Yeah, we battle Japanese Honeysuckle too. The only solution I've come up with is lots of mowing and ripping it out by hand.
Comment by anna Wed Jun 3 20:43:16 2009





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