The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Genetically Enhanced Ecosystem

mon comWhy should we grow our own rice? It's one of the cheapest food staples at the store and it's never out of season. I have not given small scale grain production much serious thought until I ran across a group called Amberwaves. They have started a small movement of citizens, gardeners, and farmers who speculate on a not too distant future where pure organic grains are no longer available. They fear many heirloom varieties will be squeezed out of our delicate ecosystem in favor of stronger, higher yielding, genetically modified products that promise a bright future if you believe the latest corporate machine promises.

There are a few places on the internet that will take you through the steps you need to get your rice started. You will need plenty of sunsine, and plan to do it during warm weather. Expect to wait 90 to 120 days before harvest. It seems the most difficult part of rice cultivation is keeping a constant level of water on your crop.dees.com

You might not be able to grow enough to meet all your grain needs, but you can feel good about doing your part to keep that specific variety of organic rice alive and kicking and pure. That is unless you have a neighbor within a few miles growing a genetically modified product. Then you run the likely risk of having your back yard rice contaminated by its stronger and more popular rival.  If this does happen you might want to make sure that same neighbor isn't one of those "Mad Scientist" types we keep reading about in the newspapers. If you do live next door to a crazy scientist then you might want to consider moving before your vegetables start re-thinking their position on the food chain.
                                          Mon humor



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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