The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Foster peach harvest

Basket of peaches

I dropped by one set of foster peaches this past weekend to see how their pruning and thinning had done. Success! Actual ripe peaches.

Peach brown rot

Unfortunately, the taller limbs that I'd left in the interest of not pruning the tree too hard all at once (then hadn't thinned the fruits on since I couldn't reach them) were full of brown rot. I think I'll be brave and whack the top off the tree this winter, water sprouts or no water sprouts.



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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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My Dad was absolutely ruthless when pruning! He carried loppers on the lawn mower with him, and nipped constantly all summer long. He thinned so much you would think there never would be anything to pick. Of course, he had the biggest most beautiful fruit you've ever seen as the result. "Do you want to grow pits or peaches?" he would say. Meaning, more in number just means more energy goes to seed production with less fruit surrounding each pit. On pruning, "You can cut the limbs off yourself, or Mother Nature will break them off for you later on." Still, it is hard for me to cut on my little babies! Good luck.
Comment by Tim Inman Mon Aug 13 08:23:28 2018





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