The Walden Effect: Farming, simple living, permaculture, and invention.

Clipping sweet potato slips

Rooting sweet potato slips.


We turned off the heating mat under our sprouting sweet potatoes a week or two ago when the daytime temperatures hit the eighties.  Then I moved them into a sunny window and the small sprouts promptly went wild.

Yesterday, I decided the biggest sprout was large enough, so I pinched it off and moved it to its own cup of water (right photo.)  Within a week or so, this sprout will have enough roots to go in the ground.  Meanwhile, other sprouts will continue to develop on the parent tuber.  With the addition of bottom heat, starting our own sweet potato slips turns out to be child's play!

(If you missed it, you can read about what our sweet potatos looked like on April 9 and April 24.)


This post is part of our How to Start Sweet Potato Slips series.  Read all of the entries:





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About us: Anna Hess and Mark Hamilton spent over a decade living self-sufficiently in the mountains of Virginia before moving north to start over from scratch in the foothills of Ohio. They've experimented with permaculture, no-till gardening, trailersteading, home-based microbusinesses and much more, writing about their adventures in both blogs and books.



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