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Planting for a Four Season Harvest, Part 9

Mid-Summer Plantings

Lettuce bedCertain plantings should be made in midsummer to provide more fresh food for late fall and, in some cases, even winter.  If the weather is hot and dry, be sure to water furrows and drills both before and after planting, and every day until seeds sprout.  Here's how I do it:
1---Beets --- soak seeds several hours before sowing;
2---Carrots --- plant all you have room for, perhaps on the early corn and bush bean sites;
3---Kale;
4---Turnips --- varieties grown only for tops; Just Right has good top growth plus large white roots;
5---Lettuce --- one short sowing.

Last call for sowing above crops --- if they're to attain good size before cold weather stops growth --- is about August 1 here.  Wherever you live, count back from the first hard-frost date the number of days required for crop to mature --- the seed catalog tells --- and then add on a week or so to offset possibly poor growing conditions.

Also in midsummer, I set out the top bulbs of Egyptian onions, which have just matured to serve as very early spring scallions next year.

September is the big harvest month when everything is in abundance.  Towards the end a light frost, 30 - 32 degrees, may threaten tender crops.  I salvage eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, which ripen inside all the next month, summer squash, cucumbers, and beans.  Vigorous plants, one or two of each kind, can be protected with burlap bags, bushel baskets; if warm days follow, these crops go on ripening.  On cold nights, the vines of winter squash and pumpkin can be drawn up around the fruit; by day, let the fruit cure in the sun.

To be continued....

Tirrell, R.  1966, February.  Planting for a 4-Season Harvest.  Organic Gardening and Farming.

Reprinted by permission of Organic Gardening magazine.  Copyright Rodale, Inc., U.S.A.  All rights reserved.  www.organicgardening.com.



This post is part of our Planting for a Four Season Harvest lunchtime series.  Read all of the entries:





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